Support

A moment to discuss model skins in game at present

    By using our site, you accept the use of cookies to make your visit more pleasant, to offer you advertisements and contents tailored to your interests, to allow you to share content on social networks, and to create visit statistics for website optimisation. More information

    • A moment to discuss model skins in game at present

      I recently started playing this game; in the last couple of weeks in fact, and so far, I've been enjoying it greatly. That being said, however, I am also something of an anorak in railfan terms, particularly in my specialty subject of British steam traction, which does mean that two particular machines in Era 2 rub me the wrong way.

      These specific units are the "Bat", whose default skin is based on the LNER Class A1/A3 Pacifics, specifically the Flying Scotsman in LNER livery as 4472, widely considered to be the most famous steam locomotive in the world; and one of the unlockable skins for the "Boar", which turns the engine into a representation of No. 4468 Mallard, one of the LNER's Class A4 Pacifics, and holder of the world's speed record for steam rail traction.


      My gripes with these engines can be easily summarised by this; firstly, the two Flying Scotsman skins for the Bat are both inaccurate- the default skin shows her as she commonly runs in preservation; in LNER Doncaster Green, as she would have looked between 1923 and 1939, but her mechanical condition is that of her appearance between 1959 and 1963, when under British Railways ownership as no. 60103, she ran with double chimney and German-style "Bat wing" smoke deflectors, and in a livery of "BR Lined Passenger Green" (similar to Brunswick Green) with the post-1957 "British Railways" heraldic device on the tender- this would also be a good choice for the unlockable version of the Flying Scotsman skin for the Bat.

      The A4 skin for the "Boar" on the other hand, is very close to looking correct, but with the 'wedge' nose is stretched too far forwards, the number is incorrect (4175 was not assigned to any LNER locomotive of the pre-WWII era, that I can find), and similarly, the tender should also spell out LNER on the side.
    • You most certainly are a superfan railfan. I can understand you annoyance at the mismatched pats/colors form differing time periods on the Flying Scotsman, and I am willing to bet the artists were looking at multiple photos from multiple eras and not realizing it. This is an awesome catch IMO!

      As for the Boar skin, I think the minor paint differences are probably necessary. There are probably some licensing and/or copyright laws that they are trying to abide, because if you look at all the production series ("skins") it is common on all of them.

      The easiest one for me to point out is the Blue and Yellow default scheme of the HORUS, because I see these everyday in my town. This is the GE AC6000cw, most powerful single engine diesel electric ever made. It is modeled after the CSX paint scheme, the largest owner of these engines, who use them here in Appalachia to haul massive amounts of coal (they are also used for mixed freight and intermodal all over the east coast). The problems - there is not enough yellow leading back diagonally from the nose, the long hood where the company lettering is should be gray not just blue, the number should have 2 lightning bolts one on either side, and the number is 344 - all of the CSX ac6000cw's are numbered 600-699 with the exception of a few specialty variations numbered 5000-5016 (in fact no railroad has an ac6000cw numbered 344). In addition this skin be more fitting for the Olympus due to its shear size, and hauling power (in real life no locomotive has ever pulled a longer or heavier train than the GE ac6000cw)

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Nerisrath: minor spelling corrections, originally left out grey coloring ().

    • New

      On the subject of the Bat, perhaps a more... acceptable model of A3 to use might be 2751 Humorist, as 2751 had been used on multiple occasions for testing smoke deflector designs, as seen in this official photograph from about 1937:





      As a side note, in 1947, Humorist, now with the number 97 (as part of the renumbering scheme the LNER undertook in 1946 to rationalise their rolling stock numbers), was fitted out with larger smoke deflectors of a more standard design, that she carried for the rest of her life, as seen here in this photograph at Carlisle in 1963, when she was British Railways number 60097:


      I personally feel that this design of smoke deflector is much more attractive than the "Bat Wings" that the rest of the A3's were fitted out with in BR days.